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2 August 2011

Social Media

Social Media Does it Again

On Saturday 23rd July 2011 people across the globe were left shocked from the news that was sweeping the world. First the atrocities in Norway and then the untimely death of Amy Winehouse. Amongst the tragedies one thing really stood out to me; the way we receive news is changing. We get information quicker and more efficiently than ever before.

The reason behind the swift news feeds are obvious… that old gem again; social media. Some say it causes all manner of problems and that children especially should stay away from sites like Twitter and Facebook. And do you know what? The people saying that are probably right. Social media isn’t a place for children because you have no control over what is being seen on it, but for adults it can be a very rewarding medium.

Amazing for news but not so amazing for the welfare of our children and there’s plenty of stories that highlight these issues.

So where did I hear about the tragic death of the troubled Amy Winehouse? Alan Sugar informed me about the news on Twitter (not personally, but I am following him). I saw this before I checked the news or turned on the television or radio. The majority of 18-30 year olds check their Facebook or Twitter accounts often; whether it is on their laptop, their mobile phone or tablet computers. For some it’s the first thing to do in the morning and the last thing to do at night. 

The thing is news has to be quick these days; people have become impatient and rely on fast updates about what is going on in the world. And last weekend's events are a perfect example of the efficiency of social media. Now instead of having to scour the internet for news information every day or going to the local corner shop to buy a paper all you need to do is follow the right people on Twitter and the news will come to you, and what's more it's completely free.

Something to think about next time you’re after some news information…

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